20+ Copywriting Tips & Tricks from 8 Copywriting Experts

 
20+ Copywriting Tips & Tricks from 8 Copywriting Experts

Not only is this a fun round up from some seriously talented copywriting geniuses, but this is the NICEST + CUTEST GROUP OF COPYWRITERS I EVER DID SEE 😍

Just like with the Squarespace tips round up, what we're trying to do here is give you some actionable tips and tricks that you can use today to start feeling more aligned with your website copy.

Because we all know a lot is riding on your website (...it is the most robust marketing tool you have for your business, ya know). So let's make sure your copy sounds like you, and that it's helping you connect with + convert your website visitors. BOOM.


     

    guys i'm not kidding...the ladies featured in this post are THE sweetest and most helpful bunch of talented copywriters. Be sure to check out the bottom of the post to learn more about them and find out where to creep them online 👀👯‍♀️

     

    The post is organized in a few different sections for you. You'll find copywriting tips on....

    • developing a brand message
    • being crystal clear with your website copy
    • incorporating copywriting into your website strategy
    • how to better connect with your website audience
    • how to write copy that sounds like you
    • "inspiration" and how to not get too inspired by your competitors
    • and lastly, how to put those biz besties of yours to use!!

    Here we go!
     

    on DEVELOPING A BRAND MESSAGE….

    Define your brand message and strategy BEFORE you start writing any copy. This will be the basis for every piece of messaging or marketing you create, so you need to be clear on it first.

    Your brand message should communicate who you are, what you do and why it's unique. Define these 3 things first. Your brand message should clearly communicate to your audience the value you provide and why they need to work with you instead of someone else who offers a similar service.

    From there you can define your brand values. You may not think your brand has any values but it should!

    Look at the things you value personally and see where they fit into your business. Your brand values should be the backbone for the copy that you write.

    For example, let's say one of your brand values is "authenticity" but you're always copying other people's content - then your messaging isn't really fitting in line with that value now, is it?

    (PS if you need help defining your brand message check out my free workbook here!) // Melanie Kernodle


    ON BEING CRYSTAL CLEAR WITH YOUR website COPY….

    Have you ever seen a really beautifully designed website but were left wondering "So, what exactly do they do?? Yea, me too.

    Be sure to answer these 3 questions (in order!) to create a clear picture of your business...
    • What you do and for whom? Use this answer to translate your products/features/services into benefits.

    • Why you do what you do? Use this to share your passion for your business.

    • What is the promise you deliver to your customer? This is a great opportunity to share why you’re different than your competitors. // Rachel Ortiz


    ON incorporating copywriting into your website strategy...

    To create copy that converts, focus first on the value and benefits your product or service provides.

    Put yourself in your target audience’s shoes and consider how your offering benefits them. Write a list of features and translate them into benefit statements.

    Let’s say you’re selling paper clips that feature a smooth, metal finish. Translated, this benefits the user by alleviating the headache of flimsy clips that stick together.

    The same principle applies to service-based businesses. For example, I write copy. So what? Well, my copy benefits clients by allowing them more time to focus on other areas of their business and increasing their conversions.

    The bottom line: putting powerful, customer-centric benefit statements front and center gives your prospects a reason to care. // Erika Fitzgerald

     

     

    Wherever possible, include calls to action in your copy. Don’t leave your clients left wondering what to do next! At the end of each chunk of copy, give them something to do, somewhere to go.

    Your About Me is complete? Take them to your Work With Me page. You've fully described what you’re offering there? Take them to your Shop Now page, or Contact Me page. Let it flow naturally and your clients will want to stay on your website and explore what you have to offer. // Katrina Widener

     

     
    Listen to the devil on your shoulder. This might sound bizarre but playing devil’s advocate can actually increase the effectiveness of your copy....

    Psychologists have found persuasive power behind arguments that voluntarily surface potential concerns — but you have to present the counterargument.

    Think of objections your prospects might have and address them head-on. Prices too high? Show them the ROI. Not for them? Explain why they’re in the right place. Applying this approach to your copy establishes authenticity and builds trust with your audience. // Erika Fitzgerald

     

     

    Guide your reader through a journey on each page and invite them to engage.

    Whether it’s to learn more, get in touch, or follow you on social media, there are so many ways to invite your audience to engage with your business even before they’re ready to fully commit to your services or products.

    You can easily do this by having a clear call to action on every page ;) // Rachel Ortiz

     

     

    Create your calls-to-action for every page before you start writing copy.

    This helps you map out where the story of each page should lead to. As you review your copy, ask yourself "Does this direct visitors to my call-to-action?" If not, put yourself in the shoes of the reader and think about what more information you'd need before taking the intended action. // Kayla Hollatz


    ON how to better connect with your website audience...

    Know who you’re talking to! One of the most helpful ways to write copy for your website is to get into your client’s head.

    Write down a full biography of your ideal buyer, including what keeps them up at night, where their pain points lie, the specific words they’d use to describe what they’re looking for, who they’d turn to if they don’t work with you, etc.

    Write down what demographic you’re going for.  Write down where they hang out and what they do in their spare time. Then cater all of your copy as if you’re speaking directly to this person!

    And to reach expert level, include the exact language from your client assessment to your copy. You’ll find that your clients are nodding along to every word you say. They’ll feel like it was written just for them, because it was. // Katrina Widener

     

     

    Keep in mind your ideal clients’ needs. When designing website copy, it goes without saying that we need to cover the basics: explain the backstory, describe our products or services, and highlight what separates us from our competition. 

    However, new companies often get so preoccupied identifying themselves as a brand that they forget about serving their client....

    Keep in mind that your customers have a pain-point – and your product or service is the solution.

    Tailor your copy to bring light to this pain-point and make sure to mention the remedy: your offering.

    To illustrate, I recently collaborated with a client to overhaul his website copy. He owns a specialty meat company that delivers to your doorstep on a monthly basis. Rather than focusing purely on the company’s attributes (the quality of the meat, how it’s sourced, etc.), we also reiterated all the foreseeable ways the product will both simplify and improve the consumer’s life. Make it very clear you have the solution to a problem they are experiencing. // Kacey Waxler

     

     

    Don't write for you - write for your audience! If you're creating a website to attract someone to book your services or buy your products, you have to speak to your audience and connect with them on their level.

    When you aren't sure what words your ideal audience would use, look at your testimonials and reviews. You'll find the words they use so you can use them!

    As a bonus: they'll usually talk about their pain points or the problem you're solving for them; you can use that in your copy, too. // Angelica Ross


    ON WRITING COPY THAT actually SOUNDS like you...

    Generally, writing about yourself is where the stale copy comes in, where you aren’t able to fully capture your drive, your passion, your excitement about your company.

    Before sitting down to write it...

    ...do this prep work first: take 30 minutes and describe in detail your ideal day in your business. Get specific! Write about what you’re doing hour by hour, how it makes you feel, why you’re grateful that this is what you do.

    When your 30 minutes is up and you’re pumped and in the zone, write your bio. Your passion and drive will shine through in every sentence. // Katrina Widener

     

     

    If you have trouble writing in your voice, speak instead.

    Record yourself talking about your business and what you provide your clients through a voice recorder. Listen back to the recording and jot down the things you notice yourself saying over and over again.

    That could mean a catch phrase, specific word you love, or even a title you refer to yourself as. Also, try not to focus too much on how weird your voice sounds like! The main point is to pull specific words and sayings you use to describe yourself, your clients, and your work. // Kayla Hollatz

     

     

    Most business owners find it SUPER hard to talk about themselves & their businesses. Why? We’re so close to the topic that it’s hard to discern where to start or what’s truly unique about ourselves. (Ironic but truthful, mates.)

    Ask a biz bud (or your cat) if you can chat business with them. Talk through what you offer, your process and some of the typical questions you get...

    Listen to the recording (and nope, most humans don’t like the sound of their own voice. Super normal. There’s science as to why!). Notice the words and language you use. The metaphors that pop out. Use THOSE in your copy. Then, when people talk to you AFTER reading your website, it’s still cohesive.

    The website voice. Your voice. The consistency builds instant trust.

    If a website is non-stop silly and punny but the brand/business owner is more of a calm, gentle soul with subtle humor? It's confusing & a bit awkward upon meeting. Better to sound how you really, truly are friends! // Allison Gower

     

     

    If you're a one-woman show, stop using plural pronouns and writing in the third person! Be proud that you're doing this by and for yourself! It'll be so much easier to connect to your customer and gain their trust when you're transparent about who is in your company.  // Angelica Ross

     

     

    Tell your audience about yourself. Audiences seeking to work with small businesses and “solopreneurs”, rather than their colossal counterparts, have an appreciation for working with small brands and the person or people who comprise them. When potential customers are reading your “about” page, they already know you are a makeup artist, poet, CPA, etc. – that’s how they came across you in the first place. What they really want to hear is “what else?” You have a passion for what you do. And you probably have a great background story on how you landed in your line of work. Don’t forget to relay that to your audience. Humans connect through storytelling – let your audience feel connected to a flat web page (and, ultimately, you) by engaging them in on a story of your own. // Kacey Waxler

     

     

    When all else fails, be direct. Hiding behind flowery words that meander around the point will leave your visitors confused instead of empowered to take action. // Angelica Ross

     

     

    If you are the face and personality of your brand, try this exercise: find 10 people (a mixed of loved ones and business cohorts) and ask them to describe you in 3 - 5 words. Take ALL the words you compile and analyze for patterns. If you consistently heard a few words, those are obviously a stand-out factor for who you are (i.e., “outgoing + funny”, "wise + serene”, "artistic + southern”).

    There will be a pattern. Use those words as inspiration for your tone. If people close to you say you’re outgoing and funny, why have a website that’s formal and all data? Let that funny personality shine!

    Use 3 final adjectives as a lens for all copy and content. Whether it’s your website copy, Instagram post or email, does it align (for the most part) with your authentic adjectives?

    It’s going to give ya major clarity. This, in turn, gives potential clients clarity - makin’ ‘em more likely to understand who you are + buy from you! // Allison Gower


    ON “inspiration" and how to not get too inspired by your competitors...

    Be careful about using other websites as copy inspiration. This is often the biggest mistake I see.

    There’s nothing wrong with looking at a competitor for inspiration and ideas, but when your copy starts to sound too close to theirs, it’s not genuine and your clients will be able to tell. (Plus, Google knows all and will penalize you for it!)

    Make sure that no matter what other websites are doing, your copy is true to you. Authenticity is always best -- it’s what your clients will flock to. // Katrina Widener

     

     

    Have fun with your copy! Many people dread writing because they’re worried they’re not good at it, but they key to compelling copy is really simple – have fun with it.

    If you enjoy writing your copy, your audience will enjoy reading it. Don’t be afraid to bring your personality to your writing and play with words that flow naturally from your heart. // Rachel Ortiz

     

     
    Don't try to emulate someone else's copy style. You may be tempted to do so because you see so-and-so has been successful in your industry by having a specific voice, but it's much better for you to sound like YOU.

    That's what your ideal clients are going to want to connect with. Let the other people in your industry sound like that so you can get back to understanding how you communicate best. // Kayla Hollatz

    ON HOW TO PUT THOSE BIZ BESTIES OF YOURS TO GOOD USE… ;)

    Always get another pair of eyes to look over your website. You’ve poured your heart into this project and now you’re ready to share it with the world – don’t let a silly spelling error dim the luster of your shiny new website. // Rachel Ortiz

     

     
    Sometimes the hardest thing is to sound like yourself and to make the point you want to make.

    If you're stuck when writing and don't sound like yourself, talk it out. Sit down with a friend and have her ask you questions you want to answer in your website copy.

    Record your answers and convert that audio into copy for your website. The act of talking to someone will help you get out of your head, make a clear point and capture your tone. // Angelica Ross
     

     

    Ask a few close friends in your business circle to read your copy. Does the copy sound like something you'd actually say, or is it full of jargon you'd never say during a coffee date? Our close friends (or even family members!) can often help us polish our brand voice because they know our true voice best. // Kayla Hollatz


    This advice is so good, right!?

    do me a favor and check out all the contributors below! click a picture to see that person's tips and be sure to click to their websites + instas so you can soak up more of their copywriting wiz kid powers 🔮✨💗

     

    allison Gower: website // insta

    Allison Gower is a brand strategist and copywriter in San Diego; a Bay Area native & dual-Irish citizen, she helps savvy business owners grow through intentional brand strategy, copywriting and copy coaching. Also a yoga teacher, Allison guides folks to downward dog in between copywriting projects. If not on her mat, she’s out dancing or taking a long walk - on the lookout for Corgis.

    Allison's tips:

    How to write with YOUR brand voice
    Most business owners find it SUPER hard to talk about themselves & their businesses. Why? We’re so close to the topic that it’s hard to discern where to start or what’s truly unique about ourselves. (Ironic but truthful, mates.)

    Here are tips for copywriting in your authentic voice - the one that’ll attract the RIGHT clients.

    • Record yourself talkin’ business

      Ask a biz bud (or your cat) if you can chat business with them. Talk through what you offer, your process and some of the typical questions you get.

      Listen to the recording (and nope, most humans don’t like the sound of their own voice. Super normal. There’s science as to why!)

      Notice the words and language you use. The metaphors that pop out.

      Use THOSE in your copy. Then, when people talk to you AFTER reading your website, it’s still cohesive. The website voice. Your voice. The consistency builds instant trust.

      (i.e. If a website is non-stop silly and punny but the brand/business owner is more of a calm, gentle soul with subtle humor? It's confusing & a bit awkward upon meeting. Better to sound how you really, truly are friends!)

    • Gather your authentic adjectives
      If you are the face and personality of your brand, try the exercise: find 10 people (a mixed of loved ones and business cohorts) and ask them to describe you in 3 - 5 words. Take ALL the words you compile and analyze for patterns.

      If you consistently heard a few words, those are obviously a stand-out factor for who you are (i.e., “Outgoing & Funny”, “Wise & Serene”, “Artistic & Southern”).

      There will be a pattern. Use those words as inspiration for your tone. If people who you love & respect the opinion of say you’re outgoing and funny, why have a website that’s formal and all data? Let that funny personality shine!

      Use 3 final adjectives as a lens for all copy and content. Whether it’s your website copy, Instagram post or email, does it align (for the most part) with your authentic adjectives?

      It’s going to give ya major clarity. This, in turn, gives potential clients clarity - makin’ ‘em more likely to understand who you are & buy from you!

    angelica ross: website // insta

    Hi! I'm Angelica. I write copy and manage social media for women entrepreneurs who are passionate about what they do, but also passionately dislike doing it all themselves. I love connecting people to awesome things, whether I'm telling you about something new I've discovered or I'm telling your audience about something great you do.

    Angelica's tips:

    • Sometimes, the hardest thing is to sound like yourself when you're writing and to make the point you want to make. If you're stuck when writing and don't sound like yourself, talk it out. Sit down with a friend and have her ask you questions you want to answer in your website copy. Record your answers and convert that audio into copy for your website. The act of talking to someone will help you get out of your head to make a clear point and capture your tone.

    • Don't write for you - write for your audience! If you're creating a website to attract someone to you to book your services or buy your products, you have to speak to your audience and connect with them on their level. When you aren't sure what words your ideal audience would use, look at your testimonials and reviews. You'll find the words they use so you can use them! As a bonus: they'll usually talk about their pain points or the problem you're solving for them; you can use that in your copy, too.

    • If you're a one-woman show, stop using plural pronouns and writing in the third person! Be proud that you're doing this by and for yourself! It'll be so much easier to connect to your customer and gain their trust when you're transparent about who is in your company. Use that "I" button on your keyboard until you wear it out! [[Nothing says "uncomfortable and unsure of themselves when it's just them, but they say "we" in their copy.]]

    • When all else fails, be direct. Hiding behind flowery words that meander around the point will leave your visitors confused instead of empowered to take action.

     

    erika fitzgerald: website // insta

    Erika is a California-based copywriter and content writer who loves nothing more than seeing spirited startups, entrepreneurs, and small businesses thrive. As a marketer with a decade of professional writing experience, she marries strategy and creativity to develop high-impact copy that connects, persuades, and ignites the imagination.

    Erika's tips:

    • But first, benefits. To create copy that converts, focus first on the value your product or service provides. Put yourself in your target audience’s shoes and consider how your offering benefits them. Write a list of features and translate them into benefit statements. Let’s say you’re selling paper clips featuring a smooth, metal finish. Translated, this benefits the user by alleviating the headache of flimsy clips that stick together. The same principle applies to service-based businesses. For example, I write copy. So what? Well, my copy benefits clients by allowing them more time to focus on other areas of their business and increasing their conversions. The bottom line: putting powerful, customer-centric benefit statements front and center gives your prospects a reason to care.
    • Listen to the devil on your shoulder. This might sound bizarre but playing devil’s advocate can actually increase the effectiveness of your copy. Psychologists have found more persuasive power behind arguments that voluntarily surface potential concerns—and then present the counterargument. Think of objections your prospects might have and address them head-on. Prices too high? Show them the ROI. Not for them? Explain why they’re in the right place. Applying this approach to your copy establishes authenticity and builds trust with your audience.

    kacey waxler: website // insta

    Kacey is a California-based writer on the hunt for connection through storytelling. Her words can be located amongst noteworthy brands including Corona Extra, Athleta, Darling Magazine, and Wanderlust Festivals, and in the flesh she can be found leading yoga classes and wellness retreats, reading unapologetically from the glow of a headlamp, or neck deep in a deliciously hot bath.

    Kacey's tips:

    • Keep in mind your ideal clients’ needs. When designing website copy, it goes without saying that we need to cover the basics: explain the backstory, describe our products or services, and highlight what separates us from our competition. However, new companies often get so preoccupied identifying themselves as a brand that they forget about serving their client. Keep in mind your customers have a pain-point – and your product or service is the solution. Tailor your copy to bring light to this pain-point and make sure to mention the remedy: your offering.

      To illustrate, I recently collaborated with a client to overhaul his website copy. He owns a specialty meat company that delivers to your doorstep on a monthly basis. Rather than focusing purely on the company’s attributes (the quality of the meat, how it’s sourced, etc.), we also reiterated all the foreseeable ways the product will both simplify and improve the consumer’s life.

      In summation, don’t assume if you give website visitors “A” and “B” (all about your brand and what makes your product/service the best), they will get to “C” all on their own (how it directly serves them). Make it very clear you have the solution to a problem they are experiencing.

    • Tell me about you… what else? Audiences seeking to work with small businesses and “solopreneurs”, rather than their colossal counterparts, have an appreciation for working with small brands and the person or people who comprise them.

      When potential customers are reading your “about” page, they already know you are a makeup artist, poet, CPA, etc. – that’s how they came across you in the first place. What they really want to hear is “what else?” You have a passion for what you want to do. And you probably have a great background story on how you landed in this line of work. Don’t forget to relay that to your audience.

      Humans connect through storytelling – let your audience feel connected to a flat web page (and, ultimately, you) by engaging them in on a story of your own.

     

    katrina widener: website // insta

    Katrina Widener devotes her days to helping others find clarity and confidence as a life coach in the Twin Cities. She’s found her calling giving female professionals the support they need to create both a fulfilling career and an inspired personal life. Her background is in marketing, social media, and journalism, with titles under her belt including Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Living.

    Katrina's tips:

    • Know who you’re talking to! One of the most helpful ways to write copy for your website is to get into your client’s head. Write down a full biography of your ideal buyer, including what keeps them up at night, where their pain points lie, the specific words they’d use to describe what they’re looking for, who they’d turn to if they don’t work with you, etc. Write down what demographic you’re going for. Write down where they hang out and what they do in their spare time. Then cater all of your copy as if you’re speaking directly to this person! And to reach expert level, include the exact language from your client assessment to your copy. You’ll find that your clients are nodding along to every word you say. They’ll feel like it was written just for them, because it was.

    • This tip is specific to your About Me section. Generally, writing about yourself is where the stale copy comes in, where you aren’t able to fully capture your drive, your passion, your excitement about your company. Before sitting down to write it, do this prep work first: Take 30 minutes and describe in detail your ideal day in your business. Get specific! Write about what you’re doing hour by hour, how it makes you feel, why you’re grateful that this is what you do. When your 30 minutes is up and you’re pumped and in the zone, then write your bio. Your passion and drive will shine through in every sentence.

    • Wherever possible, include Call to Actions in your copy. Don’t leave your clients left wondering what to do next! At the end of each chunk of copy, give them something to do, somewhere to go. Your About Me is complete? Take them to your Work With Me page. You have fully described what you’re offering there? Take them to your Shop Now page, or Contact Me. Let it flow naturally, and your clients will want to stay on your website and explore what you have to offer.

    • Be careful about using other websites as copy inspiration. This is often the biggest mistake I see. There’s nothing wrong with looking at a competitor for inspiration and ideas, but when your copy starts to sound too close to theirs, it’s not genuine and your clients will be able to tell. Plus, Google knows all and will penalize you for it! Make sure that no matter what other websites are doing, your copy is true to you. Authenticity is always best -- it’s what your clients will flock to.

    kayla hollatz: website // insta

    I’m Kayla Hollatz, a Minneapolis Copywriter, Ghostwriter and Brand Strategist who loves nothing more than crafting brand stories with soul. Except for maybe peppermint hot chocolate... we’ll call it a tie ;)

    I help creative entrepreneurs and small businesses make a real impact by tailoring their words to better highlight their brand story through copywriting and content creation. I’m known for my 6 ft. tall frame, Minnesotan accent, and talking with my hands. I believe in the Oxford comma and exclamation points. (!!!)

    Kayla's tips:

    • If you have trouble writing in your voice, speak instead. Record yourself talking about your business and what you provide your clients through a voice recorder. Listen back to the recording and jot down the things you notice yourself saying over and over again. That could mean a catch phrase, specific word you love, or even a title you refer to yourself as. Also, try not to focus too much on how weird your voice sounds like! The main point is to pull specific words and sayings you use to describe yourself, your clients, and your work.

    • Create ONE main call-to-action for every page of your website. I also recommend this before you start writing copy so you know what the story should lead to. As you review your copy, ask yourself "Does this direct visitors to my call-to-action?" If not, put yourself in the shoes of the reader and think about what more information you'd need before taking the intended action.

    • Ask a few close friends in your business circle to read your copy. Does the copy sound like something you'd actually say, or is it full of jargon you'd never say during a coffee date? Our close friends or even family members can often help us polish our brand voice because they know our true voice best.

    • Don't try to emulate someone else's copy style. You may be tempted to do so because you see so-and-so has been successful in your industry by having a specific voice, but it's much better for you to sound like YOU. That's what your ideal clients are going to want to connect with. Let the other people in your industry sound like that so you can get back to understanding how you communicate best.

     

    melanie kernodle: website // insta

    Melanie Kernodle is a Brand Message Coach + Copywriter for soulful entrepreneurs who want to grow their business and build a brand that stands out. She is passionate about helping other women start and build businesses that thrive online. When she's not working, you can find her eating tacos, taking a cat nap or just enjoying life.

    Melanie's tips:

    • Define your brand message and strategy BEFORE you start writing any copywriting. This will be the basis for every piece of messaging or marketing you create so you need to be clear on it first.

    • Your brand message should communicate who you are, what you do, and why it's unique. Define these 3 things first. Your brand message should clearly communicate to your audience the value you provide and why they need to work with you instead of someone else who offers a similar service.

    • Define your brand values. You may not think your brand has any values but it should! Look at the things that you value personally and see where they fit into your business. Your brand values should be the backbone for the copy that you write. For example, let's say one of your brand values is "authenticity" but you're always copying other people's content, then your messaging isn't really fitting in line with that value now, is it?

    Rachel Ortiz: website // insta

    Between writing stellar copy and wrangling her two children, Rachel Ortiz enjoys practicing yoga, a steady flow of coffee, and filling her farmhouse with plants and flowers.

    Rachel's tips:

    • Tell them what you do. Have you ever seen a really beautifully designed website but were left wondering ‘so, what exactly do they do?’ Yea, me too. Be sure to answer these 3 questions in order to create a clear picture of your business:
      -What you do and for whom – Translate your products/features/services into benefits.
      -Why you do what you do – Share your passion for your business.
      -What is the promise you deliver to your customer – Great opportunity to share why you’re different than your competitors.

    • Include a clear CTA (call to action). Having a clear call to action on every page guides your reader through their customer journey. Whether it’s to learn more, get in touch, or follow you on social media, there are so many ways to invite your audience to engage with your business even before they’re ready to fully commit to your services or products.

    • Peer review. Always get another pair of eyes to look over your website. You’ve poured your heart into this project and now you’re ready to share it with the world – don’t let a silly spelling error dim the luster of your shiny new website.

    • Have fun with your copy. Many people dread writing because they’re worried they’re not good at it, but they key to compelling copy is really simple – have fun with it. If you enjoy writing it your audience will enjoy reading it. Don’t be afraid to bring your own personality to your writing and play with words that flow naturally from your heart.